Emperors Once More By Duncan Jepson, Crime Pieces

I’ve recently read a couple of books set in the near future, all of which were united by the sense of impending catastrophe. Emperors Once More by Duncan Jepson is set in 2017 but the world, at first, doesn’t appear to be vastly different to that of now. However, all of the European Union is in economic crisis and has been bailed out by China. It is about to default on its debts and many Chinese feel it’s now time that old slurs and insults are avenged. Detective Alex Soong from the Hong Kong police is asked to investigate the murder of two Methodist ministers, whose deaths are quickly followed by the discovery of a gruesome massacre. The brutality of the killings has echoes of the atrocities of the Boxer Rebellion, which results in Alex approaching a renowned historian to help identify links to the past.

Despite its 2017 setting, the book has the feel of a present day thriller. Hong Kong hasn’t changed beyond recognition although the ever-watching presence of the media appears to have escalated to the extent that there is a running commentary on everything that Alex does. He is given an interesting back story: his parents were forced to give up their daughters under the one child policy and Alex is determined, one day, to track them down. He is married to the beautiful Jun, who refuses to engage in any discussion about the darker side of his job but is unwittingly dragged into the investigation.

The book is a compelling read both in terms of the pull of the narrative and enticing the reader into empathising with the central characters, which is key given some of the events that occur later in the book. One of the Jepson’s greatest strengths is the way in which he manages to write about the ferocity of the violence with a restraint that can be missing in other crime fiction writers. There is clearly more milage left in Alex Soong; Emperors Once Moreis the first in a trilogy and it will be interesting to see how the characters develop given  the changes that have taken place in their lives.

Thanks to Quercus for my review copy.

http://crimepieces.com/

Emperors Once More By Duncan Jepson, Asian Books Blog

500 Words From…is a series of guest posts from authors, in which they talk about their newly-published books.  Here Duncan Jepson explains the background behindEmperors Once More, which is published today.  The novel is the first in a Hong Kong-based crime trilogy featuring Detective Alex Soong.
Duncan Jepson lives in Hong Kong. His first novel was  All The Flowers In Shanghai.  A founder and former managing editor of theAsia Literary Review, he writes regularly for the New York TimesPublishing Perspectives and the South China Morning Post.
Emperors Once More is set in the near future. It’s Hong Kong, 2017. China has bailed out the West, but the West has defaulted on its debt. On the eve of a crisis summit for world economic leaders, two Chinese Methodist ministers are killed in an apparently motiveless execution in Hong Kong’s financial district.
It appears that luck alone makes Detective Alex Soong one of the first officers at the scene.  But is his involvement more than incidental? Is the crime itself more than a senseless assassination? It seems so: Soong is contacted by a mysterious figure, and more massacres follow.
With the eyes of the world’s media fixed on Hong Kong, Soong must race to intercept his tormentor, and thwart a conspiracy born from one of the bloodiest confrontations of China’s past, which now threatens destruction in the present.
So: 500 words from Duncan Jepson…
It is known as the century of humiliation, a term that arose in China in the early 1900s to describe a number of events that started with the First Opium War in 1839 and was thought to have ended with the Communist Revolution in 1949. Those years included painful suffering at the hands of imperial powers and unequal treaties signed requiring China to pay what would now be billions of Renminbi. But it also involved some self-inflicted injuries such as the Taiping Rebellion and a general failure to modernise as needed to defend against foreign powers.
Yet, it had not ended, following a few productive years, China fell headlong into another twenty years of madness through the 100 Flowers Campaign, the Great Leap Forward and the Cultural Revolution. In the 1970s, Chinese people emerged from isolation to find that after 5000 years of civilisation, the last one hundred plus years had left them decades behind people in the West, who barely claim half the history. It seemed an unbelievable situation and the reaction was what some psychologists call the superiority inferiority complex – bitterness at a lost rightful place in the world but also doubt in the belief that perhaps it was deserved at all. For several generations there was a feeling of inferiority, a terribly heavy burden, to some it became a belief and way of life.
Emperors Once More is a story about an angry and bitter person from the generation which feels it has been betrayed by history and a young man from the new generation of modern global Chinese who are as comfortable in Europe or the US as they are in China. I wanted these generations to clash in an open forum but I also wanted to create a story that was entertaining and that pushed me as a writer. One particular story point was the demand by the older generation to return to better days regardless of the high cost and confused reasoning.
Longing for the familiar and fear and resistance to change can push people to try to stem whatever is next and spend vast resources on avoiding confronting the inevitable. Most wasteful is expense on war and revolution just to force a return to the past. Chinese history and culture is full of examples of attempts to maintain the past and a belief in the unquestioned respect for that which once was. To be declared a great classical artist was to have copied perfectly the masters before, to honour one’s parents was to follow their instruction, perhaps even forgo one’s own life for them, and at work one would be commanded without question. So much of the future given up, but not in humble deference to wisdom, often only in blind eagerness to nothing more than age.
The main character is hurt deeply by his own and his parents’ past and he transfers all his anger to reinstating the values and beliefs of something largely best left to fade into history. But he cannot, and instead must recreate it from jagged pieces of confused understanding and mistaken belief. Only a person who wants even more a new and unfamiliar future to succeed can defeat him and the two figures repeatedly clash as the story develops, each teasing the other that they are delusional and set to fail.

 

Another important element was to try to write a story with a faster pace than my first novel, and to meet the conventions of a crime novel. The level of difficulty was much more demanding and complex than I had imagined. A crime novel must meet the reader at pace and then maintain that momentum. I can only hope that I have succeeded in some way and that there is interest in a sequel as there are other relationships that I would like to explore in this narrative structure which might not be so successful shaped into another form.
Emperors Once More is published by Quercus. The hardback should be widely available in Asia, priced in local currencies, and the eBook  can be purchased from on-line bookstores, or else here direct from Quercus.

Emperors Once More is eligible for the ABB Book of the Lunar Year inthe Year of the Horse – see the post of Jan 30, 2014 for details. If you want to vote for it, please do so by posting a comment, or by e-mailing asianbooksblog@gmail.com.
http://www.asianbooksblog.com/2014/03/500-words-from-duncan-jepson.html

Breaking News

Peony has sold US rights for Jang Jin Sung’s memoir, Crossing the Border. The book will be translated by Shirley Lee. After a fiercely contended bidding war amongst US publishers at auction, the highest bidder, with a good six figure number, was Simon & Schuster US. Simon & Schuster will be publishing early spring next year. More news to come.

Peony News! New author – Chris Allen

I am so pleased to announce that I have signed with Hong Kong based Peony Literary Agency and will be represented by Marysia Juszczakiewicz, which heralds the next stage of my writing and publishing adventure.

As the founder and owner of Peony Literary Agency, Marysia has extensive experience in sales of worldwide rights both in Asia and outside of Asia. She represents many writers in the region and was the first agent to represent the recent Nobel Prize winner Mo Yan.

Partnering with Peony Literary Agency is exciting. We had been looking for the right fit for my writing aspirations – searching for the literary agent who could make a personal connection, had the professional drive and proven experience as well as a thirst for breaking new authors onto the global stage.

When my wife Sarah and I met Marysia in Sydney we knew immediately that she was the perfect complement to my creative and professional style. Working with Peony on the development of my current and new books in the espionage thriller series featuring Alex Morgan and Intrepid is a matter of great fortune. I am inspired to be delving into the new books in the series with Marysia as part of our growing, strong and collaborative team.

Of the new partnership, Marysia says she is “thrilled to be working with Chris Allen. I was immediately taken with Chris’ Intrepid series – exciting and fast moving, the stories grip to the end.  I am very much looking forward to working with Chris and finding him a global readership in as many platforms as possible!”

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Sale of Simplified Chinese rights

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