Graphic Content: Darkness Outside the Night

Time Out Beijing

Darkness pic

Click here to read more »

阿乙:下面,我该干些什么微访谈

他的小说曾被@罗永浩可爱多 向出版社力荐,也曾被@沈浩波 称作“纯粹的文学集”。北岛称他是“近年来最优秀的汉语小说家之一”,李敬泽也公开表示过对他的赞赏。他当过警察、公务员,也做过体育编辑、文学杂志主编。他是“一个讲述犯罪故事的作家”,他是阿乙。下面,他该干些什么?

http://talk.weibo.com/ft/201201123503

“SOAP OPERAS TAUGHT ME TO BE A MAN!” – HOW NORTH KOREA’S DON JUAN LEARNED TO LOVE

by Seo Young-seok and Shirley Lee

 

Kim Jin-myung escaped from North Korea just last year. He is known by his friends for his sensitivity to women – a trait that isn’t considered very characteristic of North Korean men. In fact, many tease him for being more sensitive to women than any South Korean man. When asked about the secret behind this trait, Jin-myung replied, “While in North Korea, I tried to make myself like the main characters in South Korean soap operas. I thought that all South Korean men were more sensitive to women’s needs than North Korean men.” Smiling wryly, he added, “But I found that men are only sensitive in soap operas!”

Click here to read more »

KIM JONG UN’S NEW YEAR SPEECH: WHAT IT REALLY MEANS (PART 2 OF 2) NORTH KOREA’S FORMER POET LAUREATE TAKES A LOOK AT KIM JONG UN’S NEW YEARS SPEECH – IT SEEMS THIS YEAR IS ALL ABOUT STRENGTHENING LEGITIMACY, NOT ECONOMIC REFORM OR BOLD FOREIGN POLICY.

NK News.org

by Jang Jin-sung

 

North Korea’s vision for 2013: as seen through Kim Jong Un’s new year speech

Kim Jong Un’s new year speech contains two thematic halves. The first half summarizes the events and accomplishments of 2012 while the second half lays down objectives for the year ahead. The summary of 2012 boasts of the nation’s political stability and unity after Kim Jong-il’s death. It also pays special attention to the successful rocket launch. The most important part of a new year speech, however, is the second half, in which objectives are set for the coming year. Traditionally, this section is divided into five parts and this year’s speech is no exception.

Click here to read more »

Why the West Fails to Understand Chinese Literature

By Duncan Jepson

Fifteen years ago I bought a copy of Wang Shuo’s Playing For Thrills from Dillons in London’s King’s Road, a book briefly heralded by some in the West as ushering in China’s equivalent to Beat literature. Alas, this new literary genre never really took off.

Shuo and his peers wrote lots more but the books never caught on in the West. Readers there found these stories meandering and character-lite. What was more appealing to Western taste was “heavy scar” literature — writers recounting the pain of loss and suffering endured during the most terrible of the Maoist years. I have always used the comparison between Western and Chinese art — the former requiring a single perspective, complete with vanishing point; the latter having none at all — to illustrate the divergent cultural approaches to story-telling. These can lead to vastly different views of our shared world. Click here to read more »

KIM JONG-UN’S NEW YEAR SPEECH: WHAT IT REALLY MEANS

by Jang Jin-sung

 

NORTH KOREA’S FORMER POET LAUREATE TAKES A LOOK AT THE NEW LEADER’S SHIFTING TONE OF VOICE.

 

Kim Jong Un’s new year speech has broken a silence held for 19 years, for during this time, there was no new year speech in North Korea. Under Kim Il-sung, the new year’s speech was that occasion in the year when the leader provided guidance to his people. As all power is concentrated under the leader, the new year speech provided a framework and sets the tone for the coming year. Kim Il-sung made the speeches himself. After his death however, Kim Jong Il did not continue in his father’s footsteps. Instead, he chose to convey his message through editorials published by the important state mouthpieces such as Rodong Sinmun, the Korean People’s Army and the Youth Vanguard.

Click here to read more »